Tuesday, May 01, 2012

Pat Robertson on Charles Taylor in 2009: I know not the man

Richard Bartholomew notes a flip flop from Pat Robertson on the subject of Charles Taylor. Bartholomew includes a few excerpts from different articles.
http://barthsnotes.com/2012/04/28/pat-robertson-on-charles-taylor-in-2009-i-know-not-the-man/

http://www.christianitythttp://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/julyweb-only/7-7-48.0.htmloday.com/ct/2003/julyweb-only/7-7-48.0.html

So we’re undermining a Christian, Baptist president to bring in Muslim rebels to take over the country. And how dare the president of the United States say to the duly elected president of another country, ‘You’ve got to step down.’

http://www.cbn.com/media/player/index.aspx?s=WorldReach/TurningPoint/Interviews/TP44_PatRobertson_2

In terms of Liberia, I was accused of being an associate of Charles Taylor. I never met Charles Taylor in my life. I’ve never met him once. I spoke to him once on the telephone, but he called me, but I’ve never seen him in my life. So be it the Washington Post indicated that I had some business dealings with Charles Taylor, but it just wasn’t true. It is my feeling that the best help you can give to people is to enable them to have economic progress, not just handouts, but to have industry that will give jobs.

http://blog.christianitytoday.com/ctliveblog/archives/2012/04/charles_taylor.html

Robertson’s critics noted his financial interest in Liberia; at the time, Robertson had a four-year-old, $8 million agreement with Taylor to mine gold in the country. Robertson told the Washington Post that the mining operation, called Freedom Gold, was meant to fund humanitarian and evangelical efforts in Liberia.

I'm including a somewhat longer excerpt.

Taylor was elected president of Liberia in 1997 after a peace agreement ended a brutal civil war started by an uprising from the National Patriotic Front of Liberia, which Taylor led. By 1999, anti-government fighting had resumed in Liberia, and other neighboring countries, including Ghana and Nigeria, accused Taylor of backing rebels in Sierra Leone.

In 2003, international pressure forced Taylor to step down as president, and he went into exile in Nigeria. That year, Pat Robertson stirred up controversy for supporting Taylor on his show The 700 Club after President Bush and other U.S. officials called for Taylor’s resignation.
“We're undermining a Christian, Baptist president to bring in Muslim rebels to take over the country,” he said. “And how dare the president of the United States say to the duly elected president of another country, ‘You've got to step down.’”

Robertson’s critics noted his financial interest in Liberia; at the time, Robertson had a four-year-old, $8 million agreement with Taylor to mine gold in the country. Robertson told the Washington Post that the mining operation, called Freedom Gold, was meant to fund humanitarian and evangelical efforts in Liberia.


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