Monday, June 25, 2018

Sor, Gran Solo Op. 14 video w score

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT-MgArPyfk

I didn't end up writing about this work by Sor because there's already a dissertation on Sor's earlier opus number sonata forms by Christopher P Calvet.  If any enterprising guitarist scholars know where to get a copy of that monograph comment away!  Specifically ...

Christopher Paul Calvet
"Structure and Development in the One-Movement Guitar Sonatas of Fernando Sor."
MA diss., California State University, Fullerton, 1992.

I've considered writing about Sor's earlier opus number works but I just don't see the need if there's already a master's thesis out there.  I was really happy to write about the later sonata forms of Sor, though! 

I haven't blogged about music so much lately because, well, animation is also one of my interests.  But I am hoping to get back to blogging through Nikita Koshkin's 24 preludes and fugues for solo guitar.  I also hope to blog about German Dzhaparidze's 24 preludes and fugues for solo guitar as a project that, at the rate I'm going, has to wait until 2019. 

But for now, here's some Sor. 

What's interesting with this video is that as you read along with the score it helps to bear in mind Sor wrote operas and was familiar with operas by Mozart and oratorios by Haydn and Italian music, too. While the biggest names in the guitar tend to be thought of as Spanish there were a few really influential Italians.  But as I've been writing around in the last few years Italian and Spanish music, charming as so many recognize that it is, isn't German-profound.  I can see and hear all sorts of ways that elements from Spanish and Italian music could crop up in, say, ragtime and how music critics and historians and theorists with a bent for Germanic or French music as "real" art would be cavalierly dismissive of Spanish and Italian music.

it's not like Albeniz's piano sonatas are bad.  They're finely written pieces but ... anyway ... I hope you enjoy the Sor Op. 14 as much as I do. I hope you can also hear how readily early 19th century guitar sonatas can be translated into ragtime. :)

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