Tuesday, December 08, 2015

a property formerly owned by Storyville Coffee has new owner, a brief look at the speed with which Storyville associates disassociated from the former Mars Hill

Long ago there was some mystery as to what Storyville Coffee was going to do with some space it bought in Bainbridge Island.

It was a news-making purchase back in 2013 for the local press, because the property had been purchased back in 2011.

http://www.insidebainbridge.com/2013/10/08/whats-the-storyville-with-the-empty-retail-space-in-the-heart-of-winslow/

and then, later ...
http://www.insidebainbridge.com/2014/12/30/after-3-years-still-nothing-brewing-in-winslows-empty-storyville-site/

Of course by then Jon Phelps had joined the Mars Hill Board of Advisors and Accountability ...
http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/2014/08/29/mars-hill-church-updates-members-on-paul-tripp-and-new-additions-to-board-of-advisors-and-accountability/

and not everyone was persuaded that there was no connection between Storyville and Mars Hill
http://slog.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2014/09/03/storyville-coffees-connection-to-mars-hill-is-now-a-direct-one
If anything, The Stranger took some time to point out, the formal connection between Storyville Coffee and Mars Hill became more explicit if Phelps was owner of the coffee company and on the Mars Hill Board of Advisors and Accountability to boot. It was not necessarily a question of how formal the connection was as that it could be observed that there was a history of some connection between Phelps and Driscoll by Driscoll's own account.

BoAA members Paul Tripp and James MacDonald had both jumped ship by the time Phelps arrived on the BoAA, if memory serves, and Phelps and Matt Rogers were added to the roster. The BoAA apparently existed for just long enough to have some kind of role to play during the season Driscoll said he was presented with a restoration plan that he agreed to and then didn't agree to.  And once Driscoll resigned the decision was made to formally dissolve the corporation that has been Mars Hill Fellowship aka Mars Hill Church.  The formal dissolution has not been completed just yet and the foundation for planting churches has been renewed through 2016. There are still about eleven spin off churches that may potentially get some kind of funding from the foundation for planting churches, though that's just a guess.

What did get clarified by March of 2015 was that whatever connections Storyville Coffee once had with Mars Hill those were disavowed and apparently ended.

http://pugetsoundblogs.com/minding-your-business/2015/03/24/storyville-coffee-selling-space-in-winslow/

As of mid-November 2015, the neglected Bainbridge real estate has a new owner. Based on local coverage asbestos removal was an issue that dogged the property.  That might have been one of any number of potential variables that kept the real estate from getting developed by Storyville while it owned the property, which is just a guess here.

http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/local-news/a-new-chapter-for-storied-winslow-site_63096638

What's not a guess is that there's nary a trace of a Jamie Munson or other Mars Hill associated leadership in the membership of Storyville Coffee in the current SOS listing for Storyville.

https://www.sos.wa.gov/corps/search_detail.aspx?ubi=602670205

Munson's blog has not exactly been burbling with activity.  One of the last posts was more than a year ago, announcing that Money was available again.

a few other entries ...

http://www.jamiemunson.com/2014/09/17/are-self-imposed-deadlines-hurting-you/

...

A false deadline –that is, an arbitrary deadline we’ve created for ourselves – can quickly lead to mediocre production. For all the good intentions behind creating deadlines for ourselves, we can unwittingly get hasty, missing strategic opportunities. In the rush to meet a deadline, we can make tactical mistakes that should never have been made.

When a deadline is fixed outside of our control, we can excuse some degree of error in the act of prioritizing for the deadline. You’ve seen it happen: your colleagues look you in the eye and say, “It is what it is. We’ve got to work with what we’ve got. There’s no time to go back and make it perfect.” It’s all well and good in those circumstances, and in the best organizations, those kinds of intense decision points can actually save you from a heck of a lot of unnecessary debate that  slows down the project.

The real problem is that when we set our own false deadlines, we can take those “it-is-what-it-is” moments and live with them as though we don’t have the option of moving a deadline. When you fix a false deadline, it’s easy to sacrifice quality for the sake of production. And that can be detrimental to your organization.

How much Munson was writing from direct experience never got clarified because the post wrapped up a few sentences later but since Mars Hill no longer exists and managed to scrub away any vestiges of Munson's legacy within it almost as thoroughly as Storyville representation disavowed any connection to any Mars Hill anything it's tough to know whether Munson's generalizations have had any connection to any practical experience or not. 

Although ... with that warning in bold about how a false deadline can lead to sacrificing quality for production that "could" sound to a few former Mars Hill members like what happened back in 2007 when a high pressure push to pass revised bylaws was coming up and two guys in the leadership roster were seen as standing in the way of that set of bylaws getting passed. 

Well, moving along ... Munson explained a little about his later days in a company ...
http://www.jamiemunson.com/2014/09/30/the-key-to-making-big-decisions/

...

When I was leaving my last role as an executive in a start up retail coffee company, I was torn. I enjoyed what I was doing but I felt like something was missing that I couldn’t put my finger on. One day it clicked, I need to prioritize what I’m looking for in my career to help me make the decision of whether I should go or stay. If you’ve read my blog long enough you’ve started to notice that I love to prioritize. It’s the single most helpful thing I’ve found to more effectively manage my life and leadership. It’s a process that can be applied to anything, including how to make a really big career decision. Beyond myself, I love helping clients walk through this process; clarity is a powerful tool.

Why, yes, clarity is a powerful tool ... if you ever use it.  And it is surely clear, as Munson put it in the prior paragraph from the quoted post that he has received and given a lot of cliché advice! Like "Own it and Move On".  If you managed to read through the "Key" and got any clarity as to what on earth Munson was missing that he couldn't put his finger on comments are an option (though they automatically go into moderation).

Meanwhile, Storyville seems to have moved on from seeing any need to acknowledge any history of any connection to anybody from Mars Hill. 

In other news ... Full Sail has gotten some flack on the matter of being a for profit college whose students have some pretty high levels of debt.

https://news.vice.com/article/a-form-of-permanent-wage-theft-when-the-soaring-price-of-college-isnt-worth-it

and in more local real estate news ... Throckmorton's noted that ...

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/warrenthrockmorton/2015/12/05/former-mars-hill-church-downtown-now-known-as-the-mark/

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