Tuesday, November 10, 2015

links with an educational theme

Cheating in Online Classes Is Now Big Business

As has been noted over the years, no field of study is really "safe" from rigging things.

Elite Liberal-Arts Colleges Aren't Producing the Highest-Earning Elites

Ignore Prestige: The Colleges That Provide the Biggest Earnings Boost

...

In the new world of rankings where money is king, Washington and Lee outperforms Harvard thanks to graduates with median earnings of $77,600, more than $22,000 above where expected. Harvard falls to number four with median wages of about $87,000, around $12,000 more than the estimated median salary. Villanova, Babson, Bentley, Otis College of Art and Design, Alderson Broaddus University, Lehigh, Texas A & M International University, and California State University-Bakersfield round out the top 10. Princeton and Yale fall to 772 and 1,270, respectively, with graduates who earn less than the researchers’ models would have anticipated.

So what has been going on at Yale?  Well ... there's different takes on one of the recent things.

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/11/the-new-intolerance-of-student-activism-at-yale/414810/

Friedersdorf is clearly unhappy with what he considers a shift within student bodies at elite schools (i.e. American colleges) toward totalitarian impulses.  Nora Caplan-Bricker over at Double X on Slate considers the Yale case to be different from others and an example to follow.
http://www.slate.com/blogs/xx_factor/2015/11/10/yale_student_protests_why_they_are_the_campus_pc_wars_at_their_best.html

...

But the student protests at Yale are different. They are not primarily about censorship; they are about students who feel disenfranchised and vulnerable using the language of “safe spaces” to claim a very basic right—the right not to face discrimination in their own homes. They are a call for the university to treat racism (and sexism) on campus the way it would treat most any other overt threat to the mental health and well-being of its students.

Vulnerability can be anywhere, certainly
 ... wondering a little about disenfranchisement at Yale, though.  Could not "check your privilege" apply to literally anyone who's able to attend Yale to begin with?  Or has the placing 1,270 changed things?

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