Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Driscoll revisits how great the American Puritans this week, although actual Puritans would have considered him a depraved dude if we actually consult their work

http://markdriscoll.org/puritans-and-pilgrims-and-thanksgiving/
...
The Puritan vision of the Pilgrims saw the rule of Jesus Christ as extending over all aspects of culture. Nothing was considered secular, but rather everything from work to leisure was sacred and to be done unto the Lord. Puritan worship included sermons lasting two hours,
Sunday as a dedicated day of Sabbath for all, buildings without stained glass or icons, and congregational singing absent of musical accompaniment.

Holidays, such as Christmas and Easter, were not celebrated because of their pagan roots, and some people even worked on Christmas day in protest. Puritan authority was rooted in Scripture, while such things as secular philosophies of law and spiritual authorities such as the Pope and the Book of Common Prayer were rejected in favor of a radical biblicalism.
...


Now I've developed an affection for some of the writings of the English Puritans but the American strain may well never live down things like Salem witch trials.  There's a new-ish book out about that that's been written of lately ...

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/11/how-satan-came-to-salem/407866/
...
Even after the Salem tumult subsided, very few New Englanders at any social level rejected the existence of witchcraft; many still maintained that Satan’s minions had been busy in Massachusetts, only among the accusers rather than the accused. Perhaps they were right. The devil could scarcely have planned things more neatly, especially as more and more adults joined the ranks of the complainants. “Who doesn’t have a bone to pick with a neighbor?,” Schiff writes. “There were as many reasons to accuse someone of witchcraft in 1692 as there were to denounce him under the Nazi occupation of France: envy, insecurity, political enmity, unrequited love, love that had run its course.”


Witchcraft certainly served the needs of colonial leaders like Mather and Danforth—until it didn’t. Recent political developments on both sides of the Atlantic were eroding the authority, spiritual and temporal, of the Puritan fathers. A touch of black magic couldn’t have come at a better time. To a modern reader, the witch scare seems like a sudden, disorienting irruption of the supernatural into everyday life. It probably felt that way to many in Salem, too, but at the same time it was also part of the daily grind of Puritanism, a reminder of the dark lord’s ubiquitous pluckings and pinchings.

Its location escapes me but J. I. Packer gave a lecture long ago in which he stated that the influence of the English Puritans was paradoxically necessarily derived from their complete failure to enact the reforms they envisioned for the Church of England. 


For those who haven't read about this before, here's a link to a few observations from Puritans about the Song of Songs to show that whatever public praise Mark Driscoll still ladles on the Puritans, they would have considered his interpretive approach to the Song of Songs a depraved hedonistic anathema. If the dude's going to keep recycling the old praise for the Puritans we can keep recycling reference to how if you actually read them they say some things about things like Mark's approach to Song of Songs and to what a husband should not publicly say about his spouse that, thanks to the passing of centuries, are now public domain.
http://wenatcheethehatchet.blogspot.com/2014/05/driscoll-vs-puritans-on-subject-of-song.html

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

The Puritans...would have considered his interpretive approach to the Song of Songs a depraved hedonistic anathema.

Quote of the Month

Anonymous said...

Mark Driscoll is scheduled to speak at Jimmy Evans'church Trinity Fellowship,January 5th in Amarillo, TX.