Saturday, July 11, 2015

The Evolution of Markulinity: Driscoll looks back on the WW2 days in 2006 and 2011 and explains that though he sinned a lot, his heart was right, and the results were great

http://wenatcheethehatchet.blogspot.com/2014/07/the-historical-and-social-setting-for.html

For as often as people have said Mark Driscoll apologized for the stuff he said as William Wallace II, the closest thing to an unequivocal apology for both how he said things and what he said we have to wait for … maybe the Brian Houston interview.  Even though Driscoll still describes himself as a complementarian (never mind Grace being his “functional pastor”), and as a Reformed guy, he assured Houston that the William Wallace II rants no longer reflect how he feels. 

Except that, as Wenatchee The Hatchet has been writing for years, Mark Driscoll has never once retracted the substance of his stated views about anything.  He has apologized for his tone but not retracted the substance of things he said as William Wallace II in a way that is clear and to the point.

Now let’s go back and revisit what he had to say for himself and William Wallace II back in 2006.

CONFESSIONS OF A REFORMISSION REV
Mark Driscoll,  Zondervan
copyright (c) 2006 by Mark Driscoll
ISBN-13: 978-0-310-27016-4
ISBN-10:0-310-27016-2
CHAPTER FIVE: JESUS, WHY AM I GETTING FATTER AND MEANER?
350-1,000 people

At this time, our church also started an unmoderated discussion board on our website, called Midrash, and it was being inundated with postings by emerging-church type feminists and liberals. I went onto the site and posted as William Wallace II, after the great Scottish man portrayed in the movie Braveheart, and attacked those who were posting. It got insane, and thousands of posts were being made each day until it was discovered that it was me raging like a madman under the guise of a movie character. One guy got so mad that he actually showed up at my house to fight me one night around 3 a.m. [emphasis added]

Things were starting to get out of hand with the men, so I called a meeting and demanded that all of the men in our church attend. I preached for more than two hours about manhood and basically gave the dad talk to my men for looking at porno, sleeping with young women, not serving Christ, not working hard at their jobs, and so on. I demanded that the men who were with me on our mission to change the city stay and that the rest leave the church and stop getting in the way because you can't charge hell with your pants around your ankles, a bottle of lotion in one hand, and a Kleenex in the other.

On their way out of that meeting, I handed each man two stones and told them that on this day God was giving them their balls back to get the courage to do kingdom work. Guys put them on their monitors at work or glued them to the dash of their truck and kept them. The stones of remembrances from the Old Testament. The next week the offering doubled and the men caught fire. It was a surreal time, since I was basically fathering guys my own age and treating them more like a military unit than a church.

The life change was unreal. We had guys getting saved. We had gay guys going straight. We had guys tossing out porn, getting jobs, tithing, taking wives, buying homes, making babies, and repenting of the sins of their fathers. We had guys who had divorced their wives remarrying them. We had men adopting children so they would have a Christian father. It was a lot like Acts because the whole city seemed to be abuzz.

This season was messy and I sinned and cussed a lot, but God somehow drew a straight line with my crooked Philistine stick.  I had a good mission, but some of my tactics were born out of anger and burnout, and I did a lot of harm and damage while attracting a lot of attention.

Keep in mind “the life change was unreal”. Driscoll said there were gay guys going straight. The season was messy … but somehow God drew a straight line with Mark Driscoll, the crooked Philistine stick.  He had a good mission.  This is not looking like someone who was really saying he was sorry for what he said or even how he said it back in 2006, let alone 2000.  He may truly regret what he said and did, but it wasn’t until the Houston interview he came close to putting things that way. 
Why say that?  Because, well, in the 2011 fundraising film we see that Mark Driscoll didn’t just repeat that the guys shaped up when he yelled at them.  This time around there were guys volunteering to describe ways in which either their lives or the lives of other guys were changed by Driscoll ranting at them to grow up.  By 2000 the aim of compelling young guys to grow up had become explicit in every possible sense.  “Pussified Nation” happened, and Driscoll explained that while that was the negative, a shift would be toward positive alternatives.  Thus, Dead Men.  We can let guys describe it for us here:


Pastor AJ: There was an event at the Paradox, and Pastor Mark’s getting all the guys together.
‘Cause guys would repent of sin, and then they want to meet and they’d be talking, “Oh, I’m sleeping with my girlfriend.” “Oh, I’m looking at porn.” “Oh, I can’t get a job.” “Oh, I don’t know what I want to do with my life.”

[Driscoll] And it got to the point where I couldn’t have that many counseling meetings, so I just decided to bring all the guys together and absolutely yell at all of them at one time. And so I called an all-men’s church meeting.


Jason: People actually flew in to attend.


Pastor AJ: The instructions are, “Grab two stones. Read 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus. And when you finish, read them again. And when you finish, read them again.”


Jeff: And we all show up and they hand us a pair of rocks.
We literally filled up every single seat. I met every guy at the door and I told them, “I want you to shut up. You’re not allowed to talk. Nobody is allowed to speak. You guys all just sit down and shut up until I’m ready to yell at you.”

Pastor AJ: And you just keep reading 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus; 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus, wondering, “Why do I have these two stones?”

Jason: I think half the people probably thought he was going to apologize for some of his harsher rants that he’d posted online and then say, you know, “You without sin, cast the first stone.”
Pastor Phil: And that silence was just so palatable, just like, “What’s going to happen?” Like you’re waiting for an earthquake, like, “When’s it going to hit?”


Pastor Matt: And Driscoll had just had it and he was losing his mind.


Pastor AJ: Pastor Mark then goes off on the guys.

Jeff: Pastor Mark gets up onstage and just starts yelling!

Pastor AJ: It seemed like a couple of hours, just yelling at us about all of our perversion, all of our laziness, all of our lack of drive and ambition, all of our ungodly living.


“You belong to Jesus. I’m giving you your stones back. It’s your church. We’ve got to fix this building. We’ve got to raise the money. We’ve got to do this thing. This is what God told us to do.”


So I got up there and I preached a sermon on what it means to be a man. I literally think the sermon went about three hours, screamed and yelled at all of the guys.


Pastor AJ: All of us just completely, like, laid open, and he says, “You guys are men, and until you find your own stones, use these.”

And then closed in prayer and told them to shut up and leave.

Pastor Matt: And for a lot of us, this is the first time we heard this kind of stuff.

Jeff: Hearing the truth that we needed to man-up and that God had something better for us, and we weren’t seeing clearly—

Pastor AJ: Guys glued those things to their dashboards. They kept them in their pockets all the time. It was just this reminder of God has made us men, and we will be men. Who does that stuff?

Jeff: We kept hearing that over and over and over again, sermon after sermon after sermon addressed towards men, specifically young men, specifically, taking initiative to lead and love well like Jesus. And that was life changing, life changing.

There were maybe 100 to 120 guys at that time. Probably the average age was maybe early twenties, twenty years old. You’re talking college guys. But a lot of those guys, to this very day, they did it, man. They’re running companies. They’re deacons, elders. They’re starting churches. They’ve gotten married. They’re having kids. Their lives are changed and they are still, you know, hands up, chin down, feet forward, getting it done. And it’s just really cool what God did in this place.

He can’t have felt THAT bad about how things went in 2000-2001 if, a whole decade later, he was still talking about how amazing the life change was; and had men who were at Dead Men talking about how fantastic it was.   What, precisely, Mark Driscoll accomplished with other leaders at Mars Hill through Dead Men has to be understood to get a clear sense of what Mark Driscoll accomplished in the early years and it’s not necessarily a miracle but brilliant group psychology.

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