Saturday, June 21, 2014

from way back in 2003, Driscoll said that his preaching being wrong was the most terrifying part of the job

http://seattletimes.com/pacificnw/2003/1130/cover.html
Is Driscoll ever afraid that what he's preaching could turn out to be plain wrong? "It is the most terrifying part of my job," he says. "I have a team of pastors — they have the ability to edit me or fire me at will. I think any religious leader that does not have a bit of fear about what they're doing, and have people who can pull rank on them, are very dangerous."

So who can pull rank on Driscoll inside of Mars Hill Church at this point?  Perhaps in the end it wouldn't matter who formally has that ability because as far back as 2003 there was also this.

At 25, he knew it was time to start his own church. "It was crazy," he says. "I'd never preached, run a business, gone through seminary." But "it's like you're at the kids' table at Thanksgiving and someone says: 'Someday you'll get to the big table.' Screw it. I'll just form my own table."

Driscoll wasn't going to wait to do the usual years of seminary and going through the normal processes of getting ordained in, say, a denominational or confessional setting.  He may have felt like he heard that someday he'd be at the big table but he wasn't interested in waiting so he formed his own table.  And to some degree, now that the controversy about plagiarism in seven of his books has erupted in the last 12 months and news of rigging the NYT best seller list via Result Source has come to light we not only have some unpleasant discoveries about Mark Driscoll himself but in some sense a clearer and not entirely happy picture of what the table looks like now compared to whatever it was in 2003.  But perhaps that's just it, it's still the people Mark Driscoll gathered to himself that would let him form his own table.  If along the way the funding resources of David Nicholas or an Acts 29 were helpful in getting some salaries, great, but in the end Mark Driscoll having his own table could make sense of having pulled back from the Gospel Coalition and Acts 29.

To date there's been no explanation of when, how and why David Nicholas stopped being part of Acts 29.  If you happen to have documentation for that ... WtH has cleared up how to get in touch (if you wish) in another recent post.

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